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How Do I Become HIPAA Compliant?

shutterstock_476686045-HIPAA-e1485879677718.jpgWith revisions to federal legislation around the security and storage of health information in the US, many businesses are aware that they need to ensure compliance with standards mandated in the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA). But that's left many with a big question: how do you become HIPAA compliant?

What Is HIPAA?

HIPAA is a federal legislation from 1996 that governs the security and storage of medical information in the United States. Health information can be important, especially if doctors need to share information with hospitals or other practitioners. But this kind of information is also very sensitive, and the act is designed to keep patients and their medical records safe in the digital age.

What Does It Take to Be Compliant?

Businesses become HIPAA compliant when they follow the standards of practice set out in the law. With the passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 and the subsequent rollout of changes to the US medical care program, there has been a renewed focus on HIPAA and its standards.

Any company that deals with protected health information must comply with HIPAA. To do so, the business must ensure that all required physical, network, and process security measures are in place and being followed.

Physical Security Measures

Perhaps the simplest part of being HIPAA compliant is ensuring that physical security measures are in place and followed. These requirements focus on physical access to information and the workstations they're accessible from. To be compliant, you'll need to implement workstation security. This includes policies and procedures for workstation use that identify the work to be done and how it is to be done at that station, as well as protocols around the disposal of media and equipment that may have stored health information on it. Procedures addressing how to remove information from reusable media are also required.

Network Security Measures

There are 5 requirements in HIPAA that address network and network access in order to provide more security for sensitive health information. To be HIPAA compliant, you must implement unique user identification to facilitate tracking, create an emergency access procedure, and implement audit controls to record and monitor systems and workstations that collect and store electronic health information. You must also have an authentication process to ensure that someone requesting access to health information is the person they claim to be.

Process Security Measures

These administrative measures are probably the most difficult to implementand the most important. To be compliant with HIPAA, your organization must perform risk analysis and risk management and have proper procedures in place. You must also designate HIPAA officers to monitor compliance. You must regularly audit and review use of workstations. Sanctions also need to be in place to discipline employees in breach of policy. If multiple organizations will have access to files or workstations, you need to ensure that only those who are authorized will have access to health information. You are also required to develop a contingency plan to protect sensitive health information in an emergency. You are required to evaluate your compliance and update it when necessary, and when you enter into an agreement with another business, you are responsible for ensuring that they will operate in compliance with HIPAA.

Addressable Measures

In addition to the required measures, there are also a number of items that HIPAA considers "addressable." While businesses aren't required to implement these measures to be HIPAA compliant, these additional measures provide added security for sensitive health information. These measures range from having a facility security plan to protecting your systems against malware. These items should be addressed by businesses dealing with health informationnot just to be compliant with the law, but to provide more security for patients and clients.

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